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Nitrate Rich Foods Helps Heart Attack Survivors

19 Nov

nitraterichfood.jpgNitrite/nitrate found in vegetables, cured meats and drinking water may help you survive a heart attack and recover quicker, according to a pre-clinical study led by a cardiovascular physiologist at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Findings appear in the Nov. 12 early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“This is a very significant finding given the fact that simple components of our diet – nitrite and nitrate – that we have been taught to fear and restrict in food can now protect the heart from injury. Simple changes in our daily dietary habits such as eating nitrite and nitrate rich foods such as fruits and vegetables and some meats in moderation can drastically improve outcome following a heart attack,” said lead author Nathan S. Bryan, Ph.D., an assistant professor at UT-Houston’s Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine for the Prevention of Human Diseases

Examples of nitrate rich foods include, spinach, lettuce, beets, beetgreens and other vegetables, meat in small quantities.dr-natha-s-bryan.jpg

  

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Eat your veggies, nutriscientists advise

12 Jul

Last Updated: Thursday, July 12, 2007 | 3:36 PM ET

It’s not rocket science — eating your fruits and vegetables will make you healthier, say delegates at an international nutrisciences conference in Charlottetown.

Paula Bickford, a professor at the University of Florida, recommends lots of fruits and vegetables for health.Paula Bickford, a professor at the University of Florida, recommends lots of fruits and vegetables for health.
(CBC)

Close to 200 researchers in nutrisciences, the study of naturally occurring healthy compounds, are at this week’s National Research Council Institute for Nutrisciences in Charlottetown to share their findings. While much of the science is complex, at least part of the message couldn’t be more straightforward.

“A cup of blueberries in the morning, a big spinach salad, those kinds of things do benefit,” said Paula Bickford, a University of Florida professor of neurosurgery and pharmacology.

“When I talk to my Mom, sometimes I have to say, ‘Mom, you were right. Eat your fruits and vegetables.'”

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