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Why we eat three square meals a day

26 Sep

Have you ever stopped and asked yourself why we are told we have to eat three meals a day – morning, noon and night? I have never thought about it until I read this article.  Our herd instinct pushes us to follow what we are told. It has always been so so it must be true. These are the memes we propagate.  According to this article, there is no biological reason to eat three meals a day. Maybe we ought to eat only when we are hungry. Our bodies are our guide, they tell us when to eat and when we are full. But what if we are not eating enough and foods on the shelves begin to spoil? There goes the economy. See the link? There is always an economic link to whatever we do and maybe it’s time we begin questing things a little more. It is why we are endowed with a questioning mind capable of reflection and thought.

Check out the article?

(exercpt)

The number of meals eaten per day, along with the standard hour and fare for each, “are cultural patterns no different from how close you stand when talking to people or what you do with your body as you speak. Human beings are comfortable with patterns because they’re predictable. We’ve become comfortable with the idea of three meals. On the other hand, our schedules and our desires are subverting that idea more and more every day,” Freedman says.

For most of his

The number of meals eaten per day, along with the standard hour and fare for each, “are cultural patterns no different from how close you stand when talking to people or what you do with your body as you speak. Human beings are comfortable with patterns because they’re predictable. We’ve become comfortable with the idea of three meals. On the other hand, our schedules and our desires are subverting that idea more and more every day,” Freedman says.

For most of history, meals were very variable. A medieval northern European peasant “would start his morning with ale or bread or both, the

The number of meals eaten per day, along with the standard hour and fare for each, “are cultural patterns no different from how close you stand when talking to people or what you do with your body as you speak. Human beings are comfortable with patterns because they’re predictable. We’ve become comfortable with the idea of three meals. On the other hand, our schedules and our desires are subverting that idea more and more every day,” Freedman says.

Forost of history, meals were very variable. A medieval northern European peasant “would start his morning with ale or bread or both, then bring some sort of food out into the fields and have a large meal sometime in the afternoon,” Freedman says. “He might have what he called ‘dinner’ at 2 in the afternoon or 6 in the evening, or later” — depending on his work, the season and other factors. 

n bring some sort of food out into the fields and have a large meal sometime in the afternoon,” Freedman says. “He might have what he called ‘dinner’ at 2 in the afternoon or 6 in the evening, or later” — depending on his work, the season and other factors. 

tory, meals were very variable. A medieval northern European peasant “would start his morning with ale or bread or both, then bring some sort of food out into the fields and have a large meal sometime in the afternoon,” Freedman says. “He might have what he called ‘dinner’ at 2 in the afternoon or 6 in the evening, or later” — depending on his work, the season and other factors. 

http://www.alternet.org/story/152486/there_is_no_biological_reason_to_eat_three_meals_a_day_–_so_why_do_we_do_it?page=entire

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