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Why we eat three square meals a day

26 Sep

Have you ever stopped and asked yourself why we are told we have to eat three meals a day – morning, noon and night? I have never thought about it until I read this article.  Our herd instinct pushes us to follow what we are told. It has always been so so it must be true. These are the memes we propagate.  According to this article, there is no biological reason to eat three meals a day. Maybe we ought to eat only when we are hungry. Our bodies are our guide, they tell us when to eat and when we are full. But what if we are not eating enough and foods on the shelves begin to spoil? There goes the economy. See the link? There is always an economic link to whatever we do and maybe it’s time we begin questing things a little more. It is why we are endowed with a questioning mind capable of reflection and thought.

Check out the article?

(exercpt)

The number of meals eaten per day, along with the standard hour and fare for each, “are cultural patterns no different from how close you stand when talking to people or what you do with your body as you speak. Human beings are comfortable with patterns because they’re predictable. We’ve become comfortable with the idea of three meals. On the other hand, our schedules and our desires are subverting that idea more and more every day,” Freedman says.

For most of his

The number of meals eaten per day, along with the standard hour and fare for each, “are cultural patterns no different from how close you stand when talking to people or what you do with your body as you speak. Human beings are comfortable with patterns because they’re predictable. We’ve become comfortable with the idea of three meals. On the other hand, our schedules and our desires are subverting that idea more and more every day,” Freedman says.

For most of history, meals were very variable. A medieval northern European peasant “would start his morning with ale or bread or both, the

The number of meals eaten per day, along with the standard hour and fare for each, “are cultural patterns no different from how close you stand when talking to people or what you do with your body as you speak. Human beings are comfortable with patterns because they’re predictable. We’ve become comfortable with the idea of three meals. On the other hand, our schedules and our desires are subverting that idea more and more every day,” Freedman says.

Forost of history, meals were very variable. A medieval northern European peasant “would start his morning with ale or bread or both, then bring some sort of food out into the fields and have a large meal sometime in the afternoon,” Freedman says. “He might have what he called ‘dinner’ at 2 in the afternoon or 6 in the evening, or later” — depending on his work, the season and other factors. 

n bring some sort of food out into the fields and have a large meal sometime in the afternoon,” Freedman says. “He might have what he called ‘dinner’ at 2 in the afternoon or 6 in the evening, or later” — depending on his work, the season and other factors. 

tory, meals were very variable. A medieval northern European peasant “would start his morning with ale or bread or both, then bring some sort of food out into the fields and have a large meal sometime in the afternoon,” Freedman says. “He might have what he called ‘dinner’ at 2 in the afternoon or 6 in the evening, or later” — depending on his work, the season and other factors. 

http://www.alternet.org/story/152486/there_is_no_biological_reason_to_eat_three_meals_a_day_–_so_why_do_we_do_it?page=entire

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Is ignorance bliss or deadly?

1 Nov

Researchers at the New England Journal of Medicine said that many brain abnormalities show no outward symptoms these may include silent strokes, aneurysm, benign tumours and that people may go through life without knowing.

  They wonder if ignorance is bliss. If people do not know then they will not worry about their condition.  However some researchers contend that it is better to know so that the problem can be addressed sooner than when it is too late.

They found that symptoms are seen quicker in older than younger people.

Dutch researchers used magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to take a peek at the brains of 2,000 healthy individuals with an average age of 63.

What they found was that as many as 7 percent of the subjects had signs of stroke. Nearly 2 percent had a benign brain tumor, and nearly another 2 percent had a brain aneurysm.

Gut-Brain Connection

23 Jul

Have you ever had a “gut-wrenching” experience? Do certain situations “make you nauseous”? We use these expressions to describe emotional reactions because emotions often trigger symptoms in the gastrointestinal tract. Nerves, stresses, mental problems, and other psychological factors can wreak havoc in the gut (see Your Gut Reactions). That’s because the brain and the gastrointestinal system are intimately connected.

The entire journey of food through the 30-foot-long digestive tract is quarterbacked by a remarkable communication network known as the enteric nervous system (ENS). This intricate nerve complex is located in the gut wall and communicates with the brain via the spinal cord. In turn, hormones, neuro­transmitters, and connections to the central nervous system that affect muscles, mucosa, and blood vessels in the digestive tract influence the ENS.

The ENS cells in the lining of the gut communicate with the brain, first via the sympathetic nerves that pass to and from the gut through transformers called sympathetic ganglia. These nerves connect to the spinal cord and then to the base of the brain. In addition, parasympathetic nerves link to the base of the brain via the vagus nerve from the upper gut or the sacral nerves from the colon. The gut and brain use chemicals called neurotransmitters to send electrochemical messages to one another by way of these nerves. Scientists say that this sophisticated “gut-brain” system is nearly equal in size and complexity to the body’s central nervous system.

Imaging studies of the brain show that functional GI symptoms are not necessarily the result of dysfunction in the bowel, but may be due to disturbances in brain-gut pathways that lower pain thresholds, affect movement through and contractions of the GI tract, and alter behavior.

We know that the brain has a direct effect on the stomach if only because the thought of eating can set off the stomach’s appetite juices even before food gets there. But the action goes both ways. A troubled intestine can send signals to the brain just as a troubled brain can send signals to the gut. A patient’s distressed gut might, therefore, be as much the cause as the product of depression or anxiety. 

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