Archive | September, 2011

Why we eat three square meals a day

26 Sep

Have you ever stopped and asked yourself why we are told we have to eat three meals a day – morning, noon and night? I have never thought about it until I read this article.  Our herd instinct pushes us to follow what we are told. It has always been so so it must be true. These are the memes we propagate.  According to this article, there is no biological reason to eat three meals a day. Maybe we ought to eat only when we are hungry. Our bodies are our guide, they tell us when to eat and when we are full. But what if we are not eating enough and foods on the shelves begin to spoil? There goes the economy. See the link? There is always an economic link to whatever we do and maybe it’s time we begin questing things a little more. It is why we are endowed with a questioning mind capable of reflection and thought.

Check out the article?

(exercpt)

The number of meals eaten per day, along with the standard hour and fare for each, “are cultural patterns no different from how close you stand when talking to people or what you do with your body as you speak. Human beings are comfortable with patterns because they’re predictable. We’ve become comfortable with the idea of three meals. On the other hand, our schedules and our desires are subverting that idea more and more every day,” Freedman says.

For most of his

The number of meals eaten per day, along with the standard hour and fare for each, “are cultural patterns no different from how close you stand when talking to people or what you do with your body as you speak. Human beings are comfortable with patterns because they’re predictable. We’ve become comfortable with the idea of three meals. On the other hand, our schedules and our desires are subverting that idea more and more every day,” Freedman says.

For most of history, meals were very variable. A medieval northern European peasant “would start his morning with ale or bread or both, the

The number of meals eaten per day, along with the standard hour and fare for each, “are cultural patterns no different from how close you stand when talking to people or what you do with your body as you speak. Human beings are comfortable with patterns because they’re predictable. We’ve become comfortable with the idea of three meals. On the other hand, our schedules and our desires are subverting that idea more and more every day,” Freedman says.

Forost of history, meals were very variable. A medieval northern European peasant “would start his morning with ale or bread or both, then bring some sort of food out into the fields and have a large meal sometime in the afternoon,” Freedman says. “He might have what he called ‘dinner’ at 2 in the afternoon or 6 in the evening, or later” — depending on his work, the season and other factors. 

n bring some sort of food out into the fields and have a large meal sometime in the afternoon,” Freedman says. “He might have what he called ‘dinner’ at 2 in the afternoon or 6 in the evening, or later” — depending on his work, the season and other factors. 

tory, meals were very variable. A medieval northern European peasant “would start his morning with ale or bread or both, then bring some sort of food out into the fields and have a large meal sometime in the afternoon,” Freedman says. “He might have what he called ‘dinner’ at 2 in the afternoon or 6 in the evening, or later” — depending on his work, the season and other factors. 

http://www.alternet.org/story/152486/there_is_no_biological_reason_to_eat_three_meals_a_day_–_so_why_do_we_do_it?page=entire

Advertisements

How to get more legume in your diet

26 Sep

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health/new-health/health-nutrition/leslie-beck/12-ways-to-add-legumes-to-your-diet/article217279

“The message from this cohort is that elderly adults who maintain a lower BMI [body mass index] by following a healthy lifestyle pattern – lower meat consumption, higher consumption of plant foods, higher physical activity levels – will live longer,” says Pramil Singh, an epidemiologist at Loma Linda University and lead author of the new study, which was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Even a small amount of weight gain (2.6 km) can adversely affect your health

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health/new-health/conditions/weight-loss/the-key-to-fending-off-pounds/article1510315/

This seemingly small amount of weight gain is sufficient to adversely affect health,” Dr. Lee said. She also noted that “preventing weight gain is preferable to treating overweight and obesity because of the limited sustainability of weight loss.”

Only 13 per cent of study participants maintained the same weight and same body-mass index during the study period. Their distinguishing characteristic was that they expended physical effort that totalled at least 21 metabolic equivalent (MET) hours per week – which translates into about 60 minutes of brisk physical activity daily.

Eating Potatoes twice a day can lower your blood pressure.

3 Sep

I often wonder why researchers spend good money to research something that is already know.  I am convinced potato is a good food and does the body good when eaten in moderation and cooked in a way that promotes health. For example boiling or baking potatoes and not deep-frying.

Well a recent research found out that potatoes eaten correctly can reduce blood pressure. How many of you out there eat potatoes regularly and still have blood pressure?  I am  sure millions. What is the purpose of studies such as these? To get us to buy and eat more potatoes? I am sure it is. There are so many foods and teas and diets that are great for managing blood pressure. Here’s an excerpt of the article

Joe Vinson, a professor of chemistry at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania, analyzed 18 patients who ate six to eight small purple potatoes twice daily for
a month and found their systolic and diastolic blood pressures (the top and bottom numbers on a blood pressure reading) dropped by 3.5 and 4.3 percent,
respectively.

 Most patients were either overweight or obese, and many were already taking medications for high blood pressure during the study, which was funded by the U.S. Department
of Agriculture
 and was to be presented Wednesday at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver. Experts note that research presented at scientific meetings is preliminary and has not yet been peer-reviewed.

While I say thanks for the study I would add perhaps these scarce research dollars might be better spent on trying to find a cure for some of these diseases rather than treating symptoms all the time.

 

%d bloggers like this: