Archive | October, 2007

Environmental Influences our Weight

31 Oct

The temptations of our environment — the sedentary living, the ready supply of rich food — may not be entirely to blame for rising obesity rates. In fact, new research suggests that the environment that most strongly influences body composition may be the very first one anybody experiences: the womb.

 

According to several animal studies, conditions during pregnancy, including the mother’s diet, may determine how fat the offspring are as adults. Human studies have shown that women who eat little in pregnancy, surprisingly, more often have children who grow into fat adults. More than a dozen studies have found that children are more likely to be fat if their mothers smoke during pregnancy.

 

The research is just beginning, true, but already it has upended some hoary myths about dieting. The body establishes its optimal weight early on, perhaps even before birth, and defends it vigorously through adulthood. As a result, weight control is difficult for most of us. And obesity, the terrible new epidemic of the developed world, is almost impossible to cure.

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How about a little lamb for a change

25 Oct

Shish Kebab 

Ingredients

       2 tablespoon oil, olive

       1/2 cup(s) broth, chicken

       1/4 cup(s) wine, red, table

       1 lemon

       1 teaspoon garlic

       1/4 teaspoon salt

       1/2 teaspoon rosemary

       1/8 teaspoon pepper, black

       2 pounds lamb, lean and boneless

       24 tomato(es), cherry

       24 mushrooms

       24 small onion(s)

Preparation

1. Combine oil, broth, wine, lemon juice, garlic, salt, rosemary, and pepper. Pour over lamb, tomatoes, mushrooms, and onions. Marinate in refrigerator for several hours or overnight.

2. Put together skewers of lamb, onions, mushrooms, and tomatoes. Broil 3 inches from heat for 15 minutes, turning every five minutes

Garlic goodness

25 Oct

If you wondered whether what your grandmother told you is true about garlic – that it is good for your health and all kinds of aliments – it’s not an old wives tale there is some truth in that saying. Researchers have confirmed that garlic is a has some beneficial effect on our health, though how much still remains in the misty world of scientiest, meaning still to be proven.  It may not be the best perfume around but to heck with its scent, we want those plaques be off the walls of our artery and this is one way we can help.

Dr. David Kraus, an associate profressor of environmental health sciences at University of Alabama, Birmingham and his team of researchers  found that compounds in garlic cause tissues or blood vessels to release a chemical called hydrogen sulfide. In large quantities, this compound can be deadly, but it’s also an essential molecule within the body, causing blood vessels to relax and reducing dangerous inflammation.

The final word on this product is still out but there seems to be consensus that a garlic rich diet is good for us. 

Kraus stressed that his study only looked at the effect of fresh garlic, not garlic supplements. “What we are proposing is that you eat a garlic-rich diet,” he said. “We haven’t really tried to look at supplements yet.”

 As usual, my standard is moderation. Everything done or eaten in moderation is the best route to take, according to this parent.

Schools are improving in cafetaria nutrition, study finds

22 Oct

Schools Found Improvinand Fitness – New York Times g on Nutrition and Fitness – New York Times Schools Found Improving on Nutrition

Recent study finds that US schools are meeting the challenge of improving students nutrition as far as the cafetaria options go. Spurred by the growing crisis in child obesity, the nation’s schools have made “considerable improvements” in nutrition, fitness and health over the last six years, according to a new government survey that found that more schools require physical education and fewer sell French fries.

Power foods to keep you healthy

22 Oct

·         Blueberries : A 2005 University of Illinois study found that a number of compounds in blueberries, including pigment-producing anthocyanins, have powerful cancer-preventive powers. Other berries have similar antioxidants in smaller quantities.

·         Walnuts: Like all nuts, walnuts are a great source of protein, fiber, and healthy fats. Unlike other nuts, however, walnuts are high in heart-healthy omega-3 oils. Enjoy up to 15 walnuts a day as part of your nut/seed allotment other sources of omega-3s include flaxseed and, of course, fish and fish oil.

·         Pomegranates: These fruits are high in flavonoids, antioxidants also found in re. Recent studies show that pomegranate juice may also help prevent heart disease.

·         Sweet potatoes : They’re rich in beta-carotene and vitamin C, both powerful antioxidants that work to eliminate free radicals (damaged cells that injure healthy cells and harm DNA

·         Tomatoes A 2002 study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that eating tomato products may reduce prostate cancer risk. The link is so strong that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now allows tomatoes and tomato-based products, like tomato sauce, to carry a health claim linking tomato consumption with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. The key ingredient is a powerful antioxidant called lycopene, also found in pink grapefruit and guava.  

·         Kale : Research shows that eating dark leafy greens, like kale, may help maintain good health by reducing one’s risk of heart disease and stroke, some cancers, and several other illnesses. They’re rich in beta-carotene, folate, and vitamins C, E, and K, which help protect against cell-damaging free radicals. Regularly eating dark leafy greens may also lower blood pressure and cholesterol and promote normal eyesight. Spinach and Swiss chard also contain these disease-fighting ingredients.

Delicious Corn Chowder

17 Oct

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon oil, vegetable
  • 2 small celery
  • 2 tablespoon onion(s)
  • 2 tablespoon pepper(s), green, bell
  • 10 ounce(s) corn, whole kernel frozen
  • 1 cup(s) potato(es)
  • 2 tablespoon parsley, fresh
  • 1 cup(s) water
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • 2 tablespoon flour, all-purpose
  • 2 cup(s) milk, lowfat (1%)

Preparation

1. Heat oil in medium saucepan. Add celery, onion, and green pepper. Sauté for two minutes.

2. Add corn, potatoes, water, salt, pepper, and paprika. Bring to boil, then reduce heat to medium. Cook covered for about 10 minutes or until potatoes are tender.

3. Place half a cup of milk in jar with tight-fitting lid. Add flour and shake vigorously.

4. Gradually add milk/flour mixture to cooked vegetables. Then add remaining milk.

5. Cook, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to boil and thickens. Serve garnished with fresh chopped parsley.

New research holds brighter picture for diabetes treatment

16 Oct

New research is emerging that gives scientists a better handle on the nature of diabetes, the 5th leading killer of Americans, with 73,000 deaths a year.What is  diabetes? It is a disease in which the body’s failure to regulate glucose, or blood sugar, can lead to serious and even fatal complications. Until very recently, the defining feature of diabetes is elevated blood sugar and the control of the disease mean controlling  the way  glucose is taken in absorbed and used for body fuel  was the key thing about this disease.  This involved, of course, the pancreas, the liver, muscle and fat. New research suggests that a hormone from the skeleton, may influence how the body handles sugar. In previous work it was shown shown that leptin, a hormone produced by fat, is an important regulator of bone metabolism. In this work the idea was that the conversation was a two-way street. the hypothesis was that if fat regulates bone, bone in essence must regulate fat..  Focusing on the cross-talk between more different organs, cells and molecules represents a “very important change in our paradigm” for understanding how the body handles glucose, said Dr. C. Ronald Kahn, a diabetes researcher and professor at Harvard Medical School.  New research is also showing that the way the body handles glucose varies from person to person  and that it may be possible to design individual protocols for individuals rather than the one-size fits all approach. The picture certainly appears brighter for future strategy to deal with this growing problem of diabetes especially Type 2 variety.

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